Courses for Spring 2024

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 0200-401 Elementary Dutch II Robert A Naborn WILL 306 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Continuation of DTCH 0100. DTCH5020401
DTCH 5020-401 Elementary Dutch II Robert A Naborn WILL 306 TR 3:30 PM-4:59 PM Continuation of DTCH 0100. DTCH0200401
GRMN 0100-401 Elementary German I Zhanar Beketova WILL 438
WILL 218
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 0100, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be able to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 0100, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet. GRMN5010401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0100401
GRMN 0200-401 Elementary German II Zhanar Beketova WILL 203 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is a continuation of GRMN 0100 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk about the past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them to understand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 0200, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN5020401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0200401
GRMN 0200-402 Elementary German II Asia Lorraine Cureton BENN 222
WILL 218
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This course is a continuation of GRMN 0100 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk about the past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them to understand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 0200, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN5020402 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0200402
GRMN 0300-401 Intermediate German I David R.F. James WILL 307 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 0400 and a minor or major in German. GRMN5030401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0300401
GRMN 0350-401 Accelerated Intermediate German Sibel Sayili-Hurley WILL 6
WILL 303
MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN5140401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0350401
GRMN 0400-401 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn WILL 315 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM A continuation of GRMN 0300. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN5040401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0400401
GRMN 0400-402 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn WILL 3
WILL 219
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
A continuation of GRMN 0300. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN5040402 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN0400402
GRMN 1132-401 Forest Worlds: Mapping the Arboreal Imaginary in Literature and Film Simon J Richter WILL 25 TR 1:45 PM-3:14 PM The destruction of the world's forests through wild fires, deforestation, and global heating threatens planetary bio-diversity and may even, as a 2020 shows, trigger civilizational collapse. Can the humanities help us think differently about the forest? At the same time that forests of the world are in crisis, the "rights of nature" movement is making progress in forcing courts to acknowledge the legal "personhood" of forests and other ecosystems. The stories that humans have told and continue to tell about forests are a source for the imaginative and cultural content of that claim. At a time when humans seem unable to curb the destructive practices that place themselves, biodiversity, and forests at risk, the humanities give us access to a record of the complex inter-relationship between forests and humanity. Forest Worlds serves as an introduction to the environmental humanities. The environmental humanities offer a perspective on the climate emergency and the human dimension of climate change that are typically not part of the study of climate science or climate policy. Students receive instruction in the methods of the humanities - cultural analysis and interpretation of literature and film - in relation to texts that illuminate patterns of human behavior, thought, and affect with regard to living in and with nature. CIMS1520401, COML1054401, ENVS1550401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
GRMN 1235-401 Autobiographical Writing Liliane Weissberg VANP 625 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM How does one write about oneself? Who is the “author” writing? What does one write about? And is it fiction or truth? Our course on autobiographical writing will pursue these questions, researching confessions, autobiographies, memoirs, and other forms of life-writing both in their historical development and theoretical articulations. Examples will include selections from St. Augustine’s confessiones, Rousseau’s Confessions, Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography, as well as many examples from contemporary English, German, French, and American literature. COML1235401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN1235401
GRMN 1800-001 German in Residence Miriam Shenouda The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
GRMN 2100-401 Texts and Contexts Sibel Sayili-Hurley WILL 4 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 2100 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level. GRMN5060401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN2100401
GRMN 2290-001 Business German: A Micro Perspective David R.F. James WILL 304 TR 8:30 AM-9:59 AM This course is designed to enhance your speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping you build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar will be covered on a need be basis. This course will prepare you to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment.
GRMN 3110-001 Handschrift-Hypertext: Deutsche Medien Simon J Richter WILL 307 MW 10:15 AM-11:44 AM This course will provide an introduction to German-language literary studies through exemplary readings of short forms: fables, fairy tales, aphorisms, stories, novellas, feuilletons, poems, songs, radio plays, film clips, web projects and others. Paying particular attention to how emergent technology influences genre, we will trace an evolution from Minnesang to rock songs, from early print culture to the internet age and from Handschrift to hypertext. Students will have ample opportunity to improve their spoken and written German through class discussion and a series of internet-based assignments. Readings and discussions in German. Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
GRMN 3240-301 Crime and Detection Christina E Frei EDUC 008 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM The detective story and the crime drama are time-honored genres of literature and popular culture. In this course, you will question the popularity of the crime novel, and the genre conventions that engage readers. What does this genre say about the Zeitgeist of cultural products, their representation of a culture, and their co-construction of a global/local identity? The process of detection, of deciphering clues, is much like the process of reading and interpretation. In this course we will read a variety of detective and crime stories, some by famous authors (e.g., Droste-Hülshoff, Brecht, Benjamin, Freud), others by contemporary authors that address interesting aspects of German culture (e.g., Turkish-Germans, gay and lesbian subcultures, DDR and Wende). We will also look at episodes from popular West, East, and post-reunification German TV crime shows (e.g., Tatort).Your research will revolve around five theoretical thematic circles through whose lens we view, analyze, and address the various texts. Be it social or sociocritical, geographical, historical, or narratological, the fascination of the crime novel will captivate you as well. Furthermore, we will deal with the historical interpretations of the genre concept of crime literature by reading critical literary criticism on the basis of Wolfgang Iser's reader theory.
GRMN 5010-401 Elementary German I Zhanar Beketova WILL 438
WILL 218
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet. GRMN0100401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN5010401
GRMN 5020-401 Elementary German II Zhanar Beketova WILL 203 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN0200401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN5020401
GRMN 5020-402 Elementary German II Asia Lorraine Cureton BENN 222
WILL 218
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN0200402 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN5020402
GRMN 5030-401 Intermediate German I David R.F. James WILL 307 MTWR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German. GRMN0300401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN5030401
GRMN 5040-401 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn WILL 315 MTWR 10:15 AM-11:14 AM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN0400401 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN5040401
GRMN 5040-402 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn WILL 3
WILL 219
TR 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
MW 12:00 PM-12:59 PM
A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN0400402 https://coursesintouch.apps.upenn.edu/cpr/jsp/fast.do?webService=syll&t=202410&c=GRMN5040402
GRMN 5060-401 Texts and Contexts Sibel Sayili-Hurley WILL 4 MW 1:45 PM-3:14 PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level. GRMN2100401
GRMN 5140-401 Accelerated Intermediate German Sibel Sayili-Hurley WILL 6
WILL 303
MW 10:15 AM-11:14 AM
TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM
This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN0350401
GRMN 5440-401 Public Environmental Humanities Bethany Wiggin HAYD 358 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM By necessity, work in environmental humanities spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring and build collaborative community to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. This spring, this broadly interdisciplinary course is designed in conjunction with the ongoing environmental humanities project, An Ecotopian Toolkit for the Anthropocene. In the framework of our seminar, students will have opportunities to work with tne project’s curators and educators as well as Toolmakers on project-based assignments that also engage wider publics around issues of climate and environmental justice. This lab-style seminar is suitable for advanced undergraduates (with permission) and fulfills the “Capstone” requirement for the Minor in Environmental Humanities. It is also open to graduate students in departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. ANTH5440401, COML5440401, ENVS5440401, URBS5440401
GRMN 5620-301 Early Modernism Christina E Frei WILL 741 W 3:30 PM-6:29 PM Topics vary annually.
GRMN 5770-301 Inside the Archive Liliane Weissberg OTHR IP CANCELED What is an archive, and what is its history? What makes an archival collection special, and how can we work with it? In this course, we will discuss work essays that focus on the idea and concept of the archive by Jacques Derrida, Michel de Certeau, Benjamin Buchloh, Cornelia Vismann, and others. We will consider the difference between public and private archives, archives dedicated to specific disciplines, persons, or events, and consider the relationship to museums and memorials. Further questions will involve questions of property and ownership as well as the access to material, and finally the archive's upkeep, expansion, or reduction. While the first part of the course will focus on readings about archives, we will invite curators, and visit archives (either in person or per zoom) in the second part of the course. At Penn, we will consider four archives: (1) the Louis Kahn archive of architecture at Furness, (2) the Lorraine Beitler Collection of material relating to the Dreyfus affair, (3) the Schoenberg collection of medieval manuscripts and its digitalization, and (4) the University archives. Outside Penn, we will study the following archives and their history: (1) Leo Baeck Institute for the study of German Jewry in New York, (2) the Sigmund Freud archive at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., (3) the German Literary Archive and the Literturmuseum der Moderne in Marbach, Germany, and (4) the archives of the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem.
GRMN 5770-401 Inside the Archive Liliane Weissberg VANP 627 T 1:45 PM-3:44 PM What is an archive, and what is its history? What makes an archival collection special, and how can we work with it? In this course, we will discuss work essays that focus on the idea and concept of the archive by Jacques Derrida, Michel de Certeau, Benjamin Buchloh, Cornelia Vismann, and others. We will consider the difference between public and private archives, archives dedicated to specific disciplines, persons, or events, and consider the relationship to museums and memorials. Further questions will involve questions of property and ownership as well as the access to material, and finally the archive's upkeep, expansion, or reduction. While the first part of the course will focus on readings about archives, we will invite curators, and visit archives (either in person or per zoom) in the second part of the course. At Penn, we will consider four archives: (1) the Louis Kahn archive of architecture at Furness, (2) the Lorraine Beitler Collection of material relating to the Dreyfus affair, (3) the Schoenberg collection of medieval manuscripts and its digitalization, and (4) the University archives. Outside Penn, we will study the following archives and their history: (1) Leo Baeck Institute for the study of German Jewry in New York, (2) the Sigmund Freud archive at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., (3) the German Literary Archive and the Literturmuseum der Moderne in Marbach, Germany, and (4) the archives of the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem. ARTH5690401, COML5771401, JWST5770401
SWED 0200-680 Elementary Swedish II Heli Sirvioe WILL 438 TR 5:15 PM-6:44 PM Part two of the elementary level Swedish course. Authentic texts and media will be introduced, as well as opportunities to communicate with native speakers. By the end of the spring semester you will be able to handle a range of practical situations, such as ordering in restaurants and cafes, shopping, talking about family, holidays, plans, daily routines, health, sports/hobbies, jobs and studies. You will work on expressing your opinions and intentions, likes and dislikes, and understanding basic authentic source media, spoken language, etc. You will also learn about Sweden in an international context.
SWED 0400-680 Intermediate Swedish II Heli Sirvioe WILL 302
WILL 438
F 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
W 7:00 PM-8:29 PM
Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills. SWED5040680
SWED 5040-680 Intermediate Swedish II Heli Sirvioe WILL 302
WILL 438
F 1:45 PM-3:14 PM
W 7:00 PM-8:29 PM
Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills. SWED0400680
YDSH 0200-401 Beginning Yiddish II Alexander Botwinik WILL 220 TR 10:15 AM-11:44 AM In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films. JWST0260401
YDSH 0400-401 Intermediate Yiddish II Alexander Botwinik WILL 219 TR 12:00 PM-1:29 PM Continuation of YDSH 0300. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation. JWST0460401