Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 102-401 Elementary Dutch II Robert A Naborn TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Continuation of DTCH 101. DTCH502401
DTCH 502-401 Elementary Dutch II Robert A Naborn TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Continuation of DTCH 501. DTCH102401 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 101-401 Elementary German I Sibel Sayili-Hurley MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet. GRMN501401
GRMN 102-402 Elementary German II Liam Tumas MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN502402
GRMN 102-403 Elementary German II Liam Tumas MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN502403
GRMN 103-402 Intermediate German I David R.F. James MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German. GRMN503402
GRMN 104-401 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN504401
GRMN 104-402 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN504402
GRMN 107-401 Accelerated Intermd Grmn Sibel Sayili-Hurley MW 08:30 AM-09:30 AM
TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM
This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN514401
GRMN 156-401 Queer German Cinema Ian Fleishman TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Taught in English. This course offers an introduction into the history of German-language cinema with an emphasis on depictions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer themes. The course provides a chronological survey of Queer German Cinema from its beginnings in the Weimar Republic to its most recent and current representatives, accompanied throughout by a discussion of the cultural-political history of gay rights in the German-speaking world. Over the course of the semester, students will learn not only cinematic history but how to write about and close-read film. No knowledge of German or previous knowledge required. CIMS156401, GSWS156401, COML156401 All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 180-001 German in Residence The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
GRMN 203-401 Texts and Contexts Claudia Lynn MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level. GRMN506401
GRMN 220-001 Business German: A Micro Perspective David R.F. James TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM This course is designed to enhance your speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping you build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar will be covered on a need be basis. This course will prepare you to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment. Taught in German. Foreign Lang Across Curriculum (Flac) Crse
GRMN 253-401 Freud Liliane Weissberg MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This seminar will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy. COML253401, GSWS252401, HIST253401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) All Readings and Lectures in English
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
GRMN 263-401 Jewish American Lit Kathryn Hellerstein TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM What makes Jewish American literature Jewish? What makes it American? This course will address these questions about ethnic literature through fiction, poetry, drama, and other writings by Jews in America, from their arrival in 1654 to the present. We will discuss how Jewish identity and ethnicity shape literature and will consider how form and language develop as Jewish writers "immigrate" from Yiddish, Hebrew, and other languages to American English. Our readings, from Jewish American Literature: A Norton Anthology, will include a variety of stellar authors, both famous and less-known, including Isaac Mayer Wise, Emma Lazarus, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Celia Dropkin, Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, and Allegra Goodman. Students will come away from this course having explored the ways that Jewish culture intertwines with American culture in literature. All readings and lectures in English. COML277401, JWST277401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 264-401 Translating Cultures Kathryn Hellerstein TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM "Languages are not strangers to one another," writes the great critic and translator Walter Benjamin. Yet two people who speak different languages have a difficult time talking to one another, unless they both know a third, common language or can find someone who knows both their languages to translate what they want to say. Without translation, most of us would not be able to read the Bible or Homer, the foundations of Western culture. Americans wouldn't know much about the cultures of Europe, China, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. And people who live in or come from these places would not know much about American culture. Without translation, Americans would not know much about the diversity of cultures within America. The very fabric of our world depend upon translation between people, between cultures, between texts. With a diverse group of readings--autobiography, fiction, poetry, anthrology, and literary theory--this course will address some fundamental questions about translating language and culture. What does it mean to translate? How do we read a text in translation? What does it mean to live between two languages? Who is a translator? What are different kinds of literary and cultural translation? what are their principles and theories? Their assumptions and practices? Their effects on and implications for the individual and the society? JWST264401, COML260401 Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) Benjamin Franklin Seminars
All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 301-001 Handschrift-Hypertext Siarhei Biareishyk MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM This course will provide an introduction to German-language literary studies through exemplary readings of short forms: fables, fairy tales, aphorisms, stories, novellas, feuilletons, poems, songs, radio plays, film clips, web projects and others. Paying particular attention to how emergent technology influences genre, we will trace an evolution from Minnesang to rock songs, from early print culture to the internet age and from Handschrift to hypertext. Students will have ample opportunity to improve their spoken and written German through class discussion and a series of internet-based assignments. Readings and discussions in German. Prerequisite: This course will be offered every spring semester. Taught in German. Arts & Letters Sector (all classes)
GRMN 315-001 German Youth Cultures TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course examines how youth has been understood in German history and how it is experienced today. Literary and non-literary texts, historical documents, and films will help us generate discussion about youth movements; subcultures; sexual expression and repression; and the social and psychological developments that have been part of becoming an adult since the late eighteenth century. Students will improve their spoken and written German during class discussion as well as through individual and collaborative assignments. Taught in German.
GRMN 501-401 Elementary German I Sibel Sayili-Hurley MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM GRMN101401 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 502-402 Elementary German II Liam Tumas MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN102402 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 502-403 Elementary German II Liam Tumas MTWR 01:45 PM-02:45 PM GRMN102403 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 503-402 Intermediate German I David R.F. James MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN103402 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 504-401 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM GRMN104401 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 504-402 Intermediate German II Claudia Lynn MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN104402 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
GRMN 506-401 Texts and Contexts Claudia Lynn MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM GRMN203401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
GRMN 514-401 Accelerated Intermd Grmn Sibel Sayili-Hurley MW 08:30 AM-09:30 AM
TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM
GRMN107401 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 544-401 Public Environmental Humanities Bethany Wiggin W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. ANTH543401, COML562401, ENVS544401, URBS544401 Permission Needed From Instructor
All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 577-401 Inside the Archive Liliane Weissberg T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM What is an archive, and what is its history? What makes an archival collection special, and how can we work with it? In this course, we will discuss work essays that focus on the idea and concept of the archive by Jacques Derrida, Michel de Certeau, Benjamin Buchloh, Cornelia Vismann, and others. We will consider the difference between public and private archives, archives dedicated to specific disciplines, persons, or events, and consider the relationship to museums and memorials. Further questions will involve questions of property and ownership as well as the access to material, and finally the archive's upkeep, expansion, or reduction. While the first part of the course will focus on readings about archives, we will invite curators, and visit archives (either in person or per zoom) in the second part of the course. At Penn, we will consider four archives: (1) the Louis Kahn archive of architecture at Furness, (2) the Lorraine Beitler Collection of material relating to the Dreyfus affair, (3) the Schoenberg collection of medieval manuscripts and its digitalization, and (4) the University archives. Outside Penn, we will study the following archives and their history: (1) Leo Baeck Institute for the study of German Jewry in New York, (2) the Sigmund Freud archive at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., (3) the German Literary Archive and the Literturmuseum der Moderne in Marbach, Germany, and (4) the archives of the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem. ENGL671401, COML573401, JWST577401, ARTH569401 Undergraduates Need Permission
All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 700-301 Research Workshop Ian Fleishman GRMN Ph.D. requirement
SWED 102-680 Elementary Swedish II Annika Carina Aahren TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Part two of the elementary level Swedish course. Authentic texts and media will be introduced, as well as opportunities to communicate with native speakers. By the end of the spring semester you will be able to handle a range of practical situations, such as ordering in restaurants and cafes, shopping, talking about family, holidays, plans, daily routines, health, sports/hobbies, jobs and studies. You will work on expressing your opinions and intentions, likes and dislikes, and understanding basic authentic source media, spoken language, etc. You will also learn about Sweden in an international context. SWED502680
SWED 104-680 Intermediate Swedish II Annika Carina Aahren CANCELED Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills. SWED504680
SWED 502-680 Elementary Swedish II Annika Carina Aahren TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Part two of the elementary level Swedish course. Authentic texts and media will be introduced, as well as opportunities to communicate with native speakers. By the end of the spring semester you will be able to handle a range of practical situations, such as ordering in restaurants and cafes, shopping, talking about family, holidays, plans, daily routines, health, sports/hobbies, jobs and studies. You will work on expressing your opinions and intentions, likes and dislikes, and understanding basic authentic source media, spoken language, etc. You will also learn about Sweden in an international context. SWED102680
SWED 504-680 Intermediate Swedish II Annika Carina Aahren CANCELED Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills. SWED104680
YDSH 102-401 Beginning Yiddish II Alexander Botwinik TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films. JWST032401, YDSH502401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=YDSH102401
YDSH 104-401 Intermediate Yiddish II Alexander Botwinik TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Continuation of YDSH 103. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation. JWST034401, YDSH504401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=YDSH104401
YDSH 502-401 Beginning Yiddish II Alexander Botwinik TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM JWST032401, YDSH102401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=YDSH502401
YDSH 504-401 Intermediate Yiddish II Alexander Botwinik TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Continuation of YDSH 503. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation. JWST034401, YDSH104401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=YDSH504401