Courses for Fall 2021

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 101-401 Elementary Dutch I Robert A Naborn TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM A first semester language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch. DTCH501401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=DTCH101401
DTCH 501-401 Elementary Dutch I Robert A Naborn TR 05:15 PM-06:45 PM A first semester Dutch language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch. DTCH101401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=DTCH501401
GRMN 026-401 Jews and China: Views From Two Perspectives Kathryn Hellerstein TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Jews in China??? Who knew??? The history of the Jews in China, both modern and medieval, is an unexpected and fascinating case of cultural exchange. Even earlier than the 10th century. Jewish trader from India or Persia on the Silk Road, settled in Kaifeng, the capital of the Northern Song Dynasty, and established a Jewish community that lasted through the nineteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century, Jewish merchants, mainly from Iraq, often via India, arrived in China and played a major role in the building of modern Shanghei. After 1898, Jews from Russia settled in the northern Chinese city of Harbin, first as traders and later as refugees from the Bolshevik Revolution and Russian Civil War. In the first decades of the twentieth century, a few Jews from Poland and Russia visited China as tourists, drawn by a combination of curiosity about the cultural exoticism of a truly foreign culture and an affinity that Polish Jewish socialists and communists felt as these political movements began to emerge in China. During World War II, Shanghai served as a port of refuge for Jews from Central Europe. In this freshman seminar, we will explore how these Jewish traders, travelers, and refugees responded to and represented China in their writings. We will also read works by their Chinese contemporaries and others to see the responses to and perceptions of these Jews. We will ask questions about cultural translation: How do exchanges between languages, religions, and cultures affect the identities of individuals and communities? What commonalities and differences between these people emerge? JWST026401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Freshman Seminar
All Readings and Lectures in English
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN026401
GRMN 101-401 Elementary German I David R.F. James MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet. GRMN501401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 101-402 Elementary German I David R.F. James MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet. GRMN501402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 102-402 Elementary German II MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials. GRMN502402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 103-401 Intermediate German I Liam Tumas MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German. GRMN503401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 103-402 Intermediate German I Liam Tumas MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German. GRMN503402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 104-402 Intermediate German II Sibel Sayili-Hurley MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries. GRMN504402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN104402
GRMN 106-401 Accelerated Elem German Sibel Sayili-Hurley MW 08:30 AM-09:30 AM
TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM
This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes. GRMN505401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN106401
GRMN 134-401 Origins of Nazism: From Democracy To Race War and Genocide Anne K Berg MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Where did the Nazis come from? Was the Weimar Republic bound to fail? Did the Treaty of Versailles or the Great Depression catapult the Nazis into power? What was the role of racism, of Anti-Semitism? How did the regime consolidate itself? What was the role of ordinary people? How do we explain the Holocaust and what kind of a war was the Second World War? Grappling with these and more questions, the first half of the course focuses on Germany's first democracy, the Weimar Republic and its vibrant political culture. In the second half, we study on the Nazi regime, how it consolidated its power and remade society based on the concepts of race and struggle. Discussions of race and race-making are crucial throughout the course. In the name of the "racial purity," the Nazi state moved ruthlessly against Germany's Jewish population and cleansed German society of all "undesirable" elements. These ideas and practices didn't originate with the Nazis and they didn't operate in a geopolitical vacuum. Thinking about Nazi racism and genocide in both its particular specifics and in a larger global historical context is the main goal of this course. HIST134401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN134401
GRMN 180-001 German in Residence The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 203-401 Texts and Contexts Christina E Frei TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level. GRMN506401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
GRMN 219-001 German Business World: A Macro Perspective David R.F. James TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM This course offers you insights into the dynamics of Business German, while taking a macro approach. Examples of various course topics include: economic geography and its diversity, the changing role of the Eruopean Union, and the economic importance of national transportation and tourism. In addition, the course emphasizes the development of students' discourse competencies, Business German vocabulary and grammar. Course assignments include oral presentations on current events, class discussions, role-play, and collaborative group work. Class time will be utilized to practice speaking, answering questions, reviewing exercises and holding group discussions on various topics. Class participation is a key component of this course. Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of economics or business required. Course taught in German. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN219001
GRMN 247-401 Marx Siarhei Biareishyk WF 01:45 PM-03:15 PM "A spectre is haunting Europe--the spectre of Communism": This, the famous opening line of The Communist Manifesto, will guide this course's exploration of the history, legacy, and potential future of Karl Marx's most important texts and ideas, even long after Communism has been pronounced dead. Contextualizing Marx within a tradition of radical thought regarding politics, religion, and sexuality, we will focus on the philosophical, political, and cultural origins and implications of his ideas. Our work will center on the question of how his writings seek to counter or exploit various tendencies of the time; how they align with the work of Nietzsche, Freud, and other radical thinkers to follow; and how they might continue to haunt us today. We will begin by discussing key works by Marx himself, examining ways in which he is both influenced by and appeals to many of the same fantasies, desires, and anxieties encoded in the literature, arts and intellectual currents of the time. In examining his legacy, we will focus on elaborations or challenges to his ideas, particularly within cultural criticism, postwar protest movements, and the cultural politics of the Cold War. In conclusion, we will turn to the question of Marxism or Post-Marxism today, asking what promise Marx's ideas might still hold in a world vastly different from his own. All readings and lectures in English. COML247401, PHIL247401 Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) All Readings and Lectures in English
Humanities & Social Science Sector
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN247401
GRMN 248-401 Nietzsche's Modernity Ian Fleishman TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM "God is dead." This famous, all too famous death sentence, issued by the 19th-century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, also signaled the genesis of a radical challenge to traditional notions of morality, cultural life, and the structure of society as a whole. In this course we will examine both the "modernity" of Nietzsche's thought and the ways in which his ideas have helped to define the very concept of Modernity (and, arguably, Postmodernity) itself. In exploring the origin and evolution of Nietzsche's key concepts, we will trace the ways in which his work has been variously revered or refuted, championed or co-opted, for more than a century. We will survey his broad influence on everything from philosophy and literature to music and art, theater and psychology, history and cultural theory, politics and popular culture. Further, we will ask how his ideas continue to challenge us today, though perhaps in unexpected ways. As we will see, Nietzsche wanted to teach us "how to philosophize with a hammer." All readings and lectures in English. COML268401, PHIL067401 All Readings and Lectures in English https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN248401
GRMN 249-401 Topics - Modernism: Truth/Lies in Lit & Flm Jean-Michel Rabate TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course explores an aspect of literary modernism intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Past offerings have included seminars on the avant-garde, on the politics of modernism, and on its role in shaping poetry, music, and the visual arts. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings. Prerequisite: Some knowledge of 20th-century poerty. Spaces will be reserved for English majors ENGL259401, COML140401 All Readings and Lectures in English https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN249401
GRMN 302-001 Places of Memory Liliane Weissberg MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM What is culture? What is German? Where are the borders between German, Austrian and Swiss culture? What is part of the "cultural canon"? Who decides and what role does memory play? Relying on the theory of collective memory (Halbwachs) and the concept of "places of memory" (Erinnerungsorte; Nora, Francois/Schulze) and with reference to examplary scholarly and literary texts, debates, songs, films, documents, and paintings from high and pop culture, this course will weave a mosaic of that which (also) constitutes German or German-language culture. Prerequisite: This course will be offered every fall semester. Taught in German. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN302001
GRMN 365-401 Kafka's Creatures Ian Fleishman TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Franz Kafka's writings are replete with bestial beings, talking animals, hybrid creatures and other non-human or quasi-human entities. Examining the monstrous or grotesque bodies his work offers up for display, this course, taught in German, will interrogate how Kafka's short stories and novellas construct and call into question the very category of the anthropological. Examining the tradition out of which this creaturely writing grows (reading Kafka's animal fables beside Aesop's, for instance) and its legacy in literature, art and cinema (comparing, for example, Kafka's Metamorphosis with David Cronenberg's The Fly), we will also attend to how these incongruous critters and bodies-in-becoming reflect on Kafka's minoritarian experience as a German-speaking Jew in Habsburg-Era Prague and are in turn reflected in uncanny and ever-evolving aesthetic forms. GRMN575401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN365401
GRMN 401-001 Trans(L)Its Christina E Frei MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Drawing on Goethe's musings on "world literature", the course focuses on authors who have arrived at their German words via global, worldly itineraries. The course considers movements between languages, including those of the students themselves and encourages students to develop their own voice as authors via a series of critical and creative writing exercise. At the same time, students develop strategies to reflect on their own language learning. This course provides an important space for German-learners at Penn to draw on one another's experiences in the program and to build a sense of community. The course is required for all German majors in the Fall semester of their senior year. Prerequisite: This course will be offered every fall semester.
GRMN 501-401 Elementary German I David R.F. James MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM GRMN101401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 501-402 Elementary German I David R.F. James MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN101402 Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 502-402 Elementary German II MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN102402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 503-401 Intermediate German I Liam Tumas MTWR 10:15 AM-11:15 AM GRMN103401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 503-402 Intermediate German I Liam Tumas MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN103402 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 504-402 Intermediate German II Sibel Sayili-Hurley MTWR 12:00 PM-01:00 PM GRMN104402 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN504402
GRMN 505-401 Accelerated Elem German Sibel Sayili-Hurley MW 08:30 AM-09:30 AM
TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM
GRMN106401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN505401
GRMN 506-401 Texts and Contexts Christina E Frei TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM GRMN203401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 541-401 Topics in Cultural Hist: Making & Marking Time Liliane Weissberg T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Topic for Fall 2021: Making and Marking Time. What is time? In the late 19th century, the questions of how to define time, how to slow down time, and, above all, how to accelerate movement have become a focus of the work by many European philosophers who have tried to come to terms with what is now termed as the Industrial Revolution, and the idea of "progress." And can time be understood as something continuous, or is it fragmented, proceeding in fits and burst? Such contemplations on time have deeply influenced writers and visual artists alike. Marcel Proust was a reader of Henri Bergson and translated his theories of time into a concept of memory. Impressionist painters insisted on picturing fleeting moments, and composers experimented with temporal sequences. Thomas Mann has tried to navigate timelessness in a novel set on a "Magic Mountain." Virginia Woolf and James Joyce have pictured an entire universe in a single day (Mrs. Dalloway, Ulysses). Early 20th century Italian Futurists made the contemplation of time part of their manifestoes, and expressionist writers and artists, as well as the supporters of the DADA movement in Germany or elsewhere in Europe were theorizing about time as well. This would influence their choice of genre and form, their writerly practice and technique. Pictures were set into motion in scholarly studies by photographer Eadweard Muybridge and finally in the new medium film. We may be able to understand a reconsideration of time as driving force for the modern movement, or simply "modernity." In this seminar, we will study a selection of literary texts of the late 19th century and the modernist movement, consider the philosophical background and changes in historiography, and consider the development in the visual arts at this time, in particular painting and the new media of photography and film. COML537401, ENGL563401, ARTH584401 Undergraduates Need Permission
All Readings and Lectures in English
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN541401
GRMN 543-401 Environmental Humanities: Theory, Method, Practice Bethany Wiggin R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Environmental Humanities: Theory, Methods, Practice is a seminar-style course designed to introduce students to the trans- and interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. Weekly readings and discussions will be complemented by guest speakers from a range of disciplines including ecology, atmospheric science, computing, history of science, medicine, anthropology, literature, and the visual arts. Participants will develop their own research questions and a final project, with special consideration given to building the multi-disciplinary collaborative teams research in the environmental humanities often requires. SPAN543401, ENVS543401, COML544401, ENGL643401 Undergraduates Need Permission
All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 552-401 Kant II Carlos J Pereira Di Salvo W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM A study of Kant's moral philosophy, political philosophy, and aesthetics, focusing on his Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, Critique of Practical Reason, Metaphysics of Morals, and Critique of Judgement. PHIL466401 Undergraduates Need Permission
All Readings and Lectures in English
GRMN 575-401 Kafka's Creatures Ian Fleishman TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Franz Kafka's writings are replete with bestial beings, talking animals, hybrid creatures and other non-human or quasi-human entities. Examining the monstrous or grotesque bodies his work offers up for display, this course, taught in German, will interrogate how Kafka's short stories and novellas construct and call into question the very category of the anthropological. Examining the tradition out of which this creaturely writing grows (reading Kafka's animal fables beside Aesop's, for instance) and its legacy in literature, art and cinema (comparing, for example, Kafka's Metamorphosis with David Cronenberg's The Fly), we will also attend to how these incongruous critters and bodies-in-becoming reflect on Kafka's minoritarian experience as a German-speaking Jew in Habsburg-Era Prague and are in turn reflected in uncanny and ever-evolving aesthetic forms. GRMN365401 Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=GRMN575401
GRMN 700-301 Research Workshop Ian Fleishman GRMN Ph.D. requirement Undergraduates Need Permission
GRMN 701-301 Pedagogy Roundtable Christina E Frei GRMN Ph.D. requirement
SWED 101-680 Elementary Swedish I Annika Carina Aahren TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Elementary Swedish I SWED501680 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=SWED101680
SWED 103-680 Intermediate Swedish I Annika Carina Aahren TR 05:15 PM-07:00 PM In part one of the intermediate year, students will research and explore a broad range of topics using authentic sources and course materials to gain greater fluency and familiarity with language and culture. You will meet native Swedish speakers and visit Swedish organizations in the Philadelphia area. Projects and assignments will give you ample opportunity to explore areas that are of special interest to you from academic, professional, and personal perspectives. We will learn about Swedish innovation, business, socio-economic and political structures, geography, tourism, migration, history, and about what it is like to live in Sweden today. SWED503680 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=SWED103680
SWED 501-680 Elementary Swedish I Annika Carina Aahren TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Elementary Swedish I SWED101680 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=SWED501680
SWED 503-680 Intermediate Swedish I Annika Carina Aahren TR 05:15 PM-07:00 PM In part one of the intermediate year, students will research and explore a broad range of topics using authentic sources and course materials to gain greater fluency and familiarity with language and culture. You will meet native Swedish speakers and visit Swedish organizations in the Philadelphia area. Projects and assignments will give you ample opportunity to explore areas that are of special interest to you from academic, professional, and personal perspectives. We will learn about Swedish innovation, business, socio-economic and political structures, geography, tourism, migration, history, and about what it is like to live in Sweden today. SWED103680 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=SWED503680
YDSH 101-401 Beginning Yiddish I Alexander Botwinik TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language. YDSH501401, JWST031401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=YDSH101401
YDSH 103-401 Intermediate Yiddish I Kathryn Hellerstein TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish. YDSH503401, JWST033401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=YDSH103401
YDSH 501-401 Beginning Yiddish I Alexander Botwinik TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language. YDSH101401, JWST031401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=YDSH501401
YDSH 503-401 Intermediate Yiddish I Kathryn Hellerstein TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish. YDSH103401, JWST033401 Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Undergraduates Need Permission
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=YDSH503401